Mini ‘how-to’ Bluetooth/Wifi combo for Raspberry PI
Stick’em with the pointy end
Virtual and not so Virtual Space
Be Still my Bleeding Heart …
The Never-ending Privacy Battle
The Many Sides of Bitcoin
Cyber Jihadists
Hacker Gangs
The New Old War
The Sacred Executioner
Scripting Aphrodites
Mini ‘how-to’ Bluetooth/Wifi combo for Raspberry PI I recently purchased the Cirago USB Bluetooth/Wifi combo to use with my raspberry pi. All things considered, I am quite pleased. Being reasonably versed in google-fu, helped, of course. Since I want the freedom to do some mobile tinkering, I need to access the pi sans a lan. That, and my latest wild hair project […]
Stick’em with the pointy end Since I have been spending a great deal of my time playing in the field of 3D design and printing, I have only recently stumbled upon, and had time to read, “Privacy for Me and Not for Thee,” penned by Catherine A. Fitzpatrick, a human rights activist whom I first encountered in the virtual world […]
Virtual and not so Virtual Space Not long ago, someone asked if I liked 3D printing better than virtual worlds. The short answer is, equally but differently.
Be Still my Bleeding Heart … “Secure web servers are the equivalent of heavy armored cars. The problem is, they are being used to transfer rolls of coins and checks written in crayon by people on park benches to merchants doing business in cardboard boxes from beneath highway bridges. Further, the roads are subject to random detours, anyone with a screwdriver […]
The Never-ending Privacy Battle This brings me back to the Hundredpercent American. To some extent he is a pet of mine. I have always rather liked him, because he has some promising qualities. For instance, he has enormous hospitality. I used to feel personally complimented by the amazing warm-hearted hospitality showered on me by Americans. […] When I realized […]
The Many Sides of Bitcoin Pariah, darling, or somewhere in between. Bitcoin has continued to linger in the daily media spotlight since the shuttering of darknet’s black-market drug bazaar, Silk Road, and the subsequent announcement of the arrest of its alleged owner, Ross William Ulbricht (aka DPR), on October 2, 2013. Media mavens have long cast bitcoin as a sort […]
Cyber Jihadists “We’re facing a very great threat of loosely-coupled, organizational networks that increasingly rely on IT infrastructure to coordinate their movements and recruit young disenfranchised, apathetic guys as suicidal pawns in a sophisticated, dispersed movement. (…)” (AHM, Usenet, September 21, 2001)
Hacker Gangs Meet Jim Script Kiddie (skiddie). He is the guy (usually in his early to mid teens) who comes into a hacker forum, asking inane questions like, “how can I be a hacker?” He also tends to over-indulge in “hacker speak” making him look pretty much like a moron to seasoned (and not so) computer netizens.
The New Old War In 1956, FBI Director, J. Edgar Hoover initiated a program, code-named COINTELPRO (counter intelligence program) ushering in what would become the mainstay for how intelligence communities dealt with domesitic affairs. The sole directive of this program was “to expose, disrupt, misdirect, discredit, or otherwise neutralize” the activities of various dissidents and their leaders.
The Sacred Executioner In his book, “The Sacred Executioner,” Hyam Maccoby notes: “A figure in mythology that has received little attention is that of the Sacred Executioner. […] By taking the blame for the slaying, he is performing a great service to society, for not only does he perform the deed, but he takes upon himself the blame […]
Scripting Aphrodites On Wednesday, April 13, 2006, 10-year-old Jamie Rose Bolin was reported missing by her father. Investigators thought she may have been abducted by someone she met online. Oklahoma law enforcement suspected her abductor might be heading just across the border to Texas and requested Texas issue an Amber alert.
image Mini ‘how-to’ Bluetooth/Wifi combo for Raspberry PI
image Stick’em with the pointy end
image Virtual and not so Virtual Space
image Be Still my Bleeding Heart …
image The Never-ending Privacy Battle
image The Many Sides of Bitcoin
image Cyber Jihadists
image Hacker Gangs
image The New Old War
image The Sacred Executioner
image Scripting Aphrodites

Mini ‘how-to’ Bluetooth/Wifi combo for Raspberry PI

I recently purchased the Cirago USB Bluetooth/Wifi combo to use with my raspberry pi. All things considered, I am quite pleased. Being reasonably versed in google-fu, helped, of course.

Since I want the freedom to do some mobile tinkering, I need to access the pi sans a lan. That, and my latest wild hair project requires the ability to connect to and interact with the pi from an iOS device while relying upon the 4G/LTE network to… ummm… do some data mining as it were. As such, I needed to setup up the pi as a standalone (as in, not connected to any network whatsoever) AP.

It should go without saying but I’ll say it anyway, be sure to backup your SD card between any major changes. For example, once you can launch hostapd without a segfault, or are able to successfully pair, back up your card! That way you can roll back to the last working version, in the event of a catastrophic failure.

That said, onward into the fray!

As it turned out, the standard hostapd package supports the nl80211 chip set as opposed to the rtl8188cus chip set. And, Cirago is, you guessed it, the latter. Thanks to Dave Conroy, however, it was a simple matter of downloading his modified hostapd package.

NB: Be sure to follow his replacement instructions! And, if you’re wary about downloading a binary from a stranger, he also provides a link to the realtek driver files for a DIY build.

As for the hostapd configuration, I must admit, I wasn’t all that crazy about Conroy’s setup, so I used this guy’s setup instead. He also provides a neat little launch AP failover script. Though, if you set it up to poll, and depending upon the polling interval, it could be resource intensive.

As for playing/recording sound with the bluetooth headset, that was a bit of a challenge also. However, I am happy to report, I was able to get that working as well. There were some key steps, which were literally, all over the place. So, I’ll list them below (with links), to hopefully save the next guy/gal who embarks on this journey.

For starters, follow steps 1 through 3 from this post.

If you’re running a headless system, you’ll need to get your headset MAC addy. You can do this by running

hcitool scan

Once you have your MAC addy, pair, trust, and connect to your device.

sudo echo 0000|bluez-simple-agent hci0 XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
sudo bluez-test-device trusted XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX yes
sudo bluez-test-input connect XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX

Where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is your headset MAC addy.

Or, you can simply use the GUI, and install the bluetooth manager.

sudo apt-get install bluesman

And reboot.

In the bluetooth manager (under start=>preferences=>bluetooth manager), find your headset, pair, trust, and connect to the “headset service.”

Once you’ve successfully paired and connected your headset

sudo nano /etc/bluetooth/hcid.conf

and add the following:

device XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX {
         name "My Bluetooth Headset"
         auth enable;
         encrypt enable;
 }

where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is the headset MAC addy

Then:

sudo nano /etc/asound.conf

and add the following:

pcm.btheadset {
   type plug
   slave {
       pcm {
           type bluetooth
           device XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
           profile "auto"
       }
   }
   hint {
       show on
       description "BT Headset"
   }
}
ctl.btheadset {
  type bluetooth
}

where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is the headset MAC addy

And finally, change the USB port speed:

sudo nano /boot/cmdline.txt

by appending the following:

dwc_otg.speed=1

to the very end of the line.

Without the above setting, which I found under audio test, you’ll get lots of static when recording. Notably, even with the above setting, if you have a crappy headset, you’ll still get static.

But, I digress.

Once you’ve rebooted, your headset should automatically pair, anytime you turn it on. Importantly, you can now play sound through your headset and record sound from your headset mic.

Let’s see, have I left anything out? Probably.

While I took copious notes, setting this up did involve some trial and error. Especially considering that no single place contained all the information. In fact, in some instances, expected results were not reflected (as in the section above the “sound test,” in the aforementioned link), and in others, it actually broke the process.

Persistence however, does pay off! And hopefully, the above spark notes have captured enough to help you on your way to a successful install of the bluetooth headset pairing and access point for this particular dongle.

Oh and. One last thing that does play a role with regard to getting this dongle up and running. And that is power. I tried two different configurations. One, with a powered USB hub. The dongle wifi and bluetooth works in any/all ports. The other configuration involved using the powergen mobile power pack 8400, in conjunction with a non-powered USB hub. In this instance, the dongle wifi and bluetooth works in the raspberry pi port but there was not enough power to drive the wifi when it was plugged into the unpowered hub.